Haas preview the Abu Dhabi GP

Romain Grosjean and Esteban Gutierrez talk about all things Haas and Abu Dhabi as they look ahead to the season finale.

Romain Grosjean
Abu Dhabi is the season finale, and it’s also the finale of Haas F1 Team’s debut season. What’s it been like to be a part of a team built from scratch and how satisfying has it been to have contributed to the team’s success?

RG: “It’s been a great season. Joining the team for its first year was something special. I wanted to be the first person to score points for the team and a top-five. The next two targets are podiums and wins. Wearing the Haas Automation colours on the podium would be pretty special. For a first year, it’s been a very exciting journey. There have been ups and downs for sure but, generally, I’m very proud of everything we’ve done. After Abu Dhabi, there will be time to sit down and see what we can improve for the future, but overall we’ve done very well for a first season.”

Is there a particular moment from this season that stands out the most for you?
RG:
“It’s always difficult to pick out one moment from the season because you have so many emotions with all the highs, the ups and the downs. If I had to say something, I’d say Australia, our first race together and our first points. When we got there, things weren’t 100 percent perfect, but we managed to pull something out of the bag and score a sixth-place position.”

Every driver wants to win races, score podiums and earn poles. However, few drivers get to help build a team. You did, and the 29 points Haas F1 Team has tallied this year are the most of any new team in this millennium. Knowing the Formula One landscape, are your accomplishments this year almost like a win?
RG:
“Yes, that’s the case for all of us. I said that on the radio after our fifth-place finish in Bahrain. It felt like a win for the team. Twenty-nine points in our first year, being miles ahead of Renault, Sauber and Manor, and not that far off from teams like McLaren and Toro Rosso – that’s a huge thing for us to accomplish in the first year. We’ve had some really good opportunities. We’ve had some that we’ve missed, but generally, our yearly review is a positive one.”

How helpful will your experience from this year be when the team has to build and develop another new car?
RG:
“I think it’s pretty important. That’s why the team, especially Gene (Haas) and Guenther (Steiner) wanted an experienced driver to be a part of the project. That’s why they didn’t rush to pick up the first driver back when they were looking to sign someone. So yes, I’m trying to help the team as much as I can. Experience is key to being successful. That’s helped this year, and it’ll be even more so for the future.”

The Yas Marina Circuit is a showplace. What makes it stand out on the Formula One schedule?
RG:
“It’s just a great venue. The race starts in the day and finishes in the night. You have sundown in the middle of the race, which is fun. The paddock is amazing. The atmosphere is always good, and you know you’re on holiday after the race as it’s the last one of the season. I’ll still be pushing one last time, though.”

Yas Marina Circuit consists of three distinct sectors. How do you find a setup that suits all aspects of the track, or do you have to compromise in one section to take full advantage of another section?
RG:
“Generally, it’s a low-speed corner circuit. The only high-speed corners are turns two and three. Normally they’re taken flat – easy flat in qualifying. The track has some long straight lines, but you mainly want to focus on getting the low-speed corners correct, especially through the last sector. That’s what you have to focus on in Abu Dhabi.”

With the race beginning in the late afternoon and ending at night, how much does the track change as the air and track temperatures cool?
RG:
“Race day’s not too bad the way it changes during the grand prix. It’s more in between FP1 and FP2, then FP3 and qualifying, where you’re out at two different times of the day. You have a big difference in track temperature and car behaviour. That’s something you need to keep in mind. We don’t have any data from the past. We won’t know what we’re doing in advance between FP3 and qualifying in terms of aero balance and setting up the car. These are things we have to find out for ourselves when we get there.”

What can you do to combat those changing track conditions during the race?
RG: “
To be fair, conditions don’t change too much in the race. You’re already racing at the end of the afternoon, so the track temperature doesn’t actually change that much by the time it gets dark. It’s normally not too bad.”

Yas Marina is a smooth track and it seems that it takes a while for the track to rubber in. As the grip level increases over the duration of the race weekend, how do you determine where the limit is from Friday to Saturday to Sunday?
RG:
“The most difficult thing in Abu Dhabi is the conditions between FP1 and FP2. You only actually have one session that is representative of the race and qualifying, and that’s FP2. FP1 and FP3 are warm, therefore you have an hour-and-a-half to determine the best setup.”

Do you have any milestones or moments from your junior career that you enjoyed at Abu Dhabi?
RG:
“I won there in GT1 (in 2010 with Matech Competition). That was my first-ever GT World Championship start, and the first race with that team, and we won. It was a pretty good moment taking the win and leading the championship.”

What is your favourite part of the Yas Marina Circuit?
RG:
“I quite like the first part with turns one, two and three. It can be fun.”

Describe a lap around the Yas Marina Circuit.
RG:
“Straight line to the first corner – it comes pretty quickly – a 90-degree left-hand corner, normally in fourth gear. Turns two and three are then flat out. You go down the hill, braking into (turn) six – very tricky braking turning into six, then straight away into (turn) seven. You need to be well positioned for the hairpin going down the back straight. It’s tricky to get the car to turn. Long straight line, big braking for the chicane, and again you need to be well positioned between the left- and right-hand side corners. Then it’s another straight line on to (turns) 11, 12 and 13. It’s a triple chicane and as soon as you exit that part you go flat out then brake for turn 14, which is a 90-degree left-hand side corner. Flat out again into (turns) 16 and 17, two right-hand side corners flat out. As soon as you go out of (turn) 17 you have to brake again for (turns) 18. (Turns) 19 and 20, you’re going under the hotel, with a tricky exit out of (turn) 20. The second to last corner is good. It’s high speed in fourth or fifth gear. Then the last corner is very tricky. It’s very wide on the entry phase with the pit lane on the right-hand side. It’s not easy to find a line. Then you go as early as you can on the power to finish the lap.”

Esteban Gutierrez
Abu Dhabi is the season finale, and it’s also the finale of Haas F1 Team’s debut season. What’s it been like to be a part of a team built from scratch and how satisfying has it been to have contributed to the team’s success?
EG:
“It’s been a very nice experience, but with a lot of challenges. There were some very difficult days for the mechanics, working day and night for quite a lot of time, the engineers as well. Being a new team, you don’t have a lot of people that you can really rotate, so it was quite a challenge for everybody, but also for myself.”

Is there a particular moment from this season that stands out the most for you?
EG:
“I would say Monza when we got into Q3 for the first time. That was a special moment.”

Every driver wants to win races, score podiums and earn poles. However, few drivers get to help build a team. You did, and knowing the Formula One landscape, are your accomplishments still satisfying?
EG:
“I would’ve liked them to be better, but the fact of building a new team was definitely something special – something you don’t really get to live very often in life. We built up something from scratch.”

The Yas Marina Circuit is a showplace. What makes it stand out on the Formula One schedule?
EG:
“It’s luxurious and it’s modern. It’s an incredible track. There was a lot of investment in it. Every time you get there it’s like a whole different world, like a Disneyland more or less. It’s nice to get there and have the last race of the season in Abu Dhabi.”

Yas Marina Circuit consists of three distinct sectors. How do you find a setup that suits all aspects of the track, or do you have to compromise in one section to take full advantage of another section?
EG:
“You have to compromise in the first sector, which is mainly about high-speed corners. Then you have sectors two and three, which are about straight-line speed and braking into chicanes and slow-speed corners. You have to manage the tires, and that’s the most challenging part.”

With the race beginning in the late afternoon and ending at night, how much does the track change as the air and track temperatures cool?
EG: “Once you are into the race, it doesn’t really change much. It changes a lot after three or four o’clock and the sun starts to go down and by the time the race starts it’s already on a very good level. Everything is more stable. The temperatures are more stable, the tires are working better and, usually, you can manage them better by not overheating them.”

What can you do to combat those changing track conditions during the race?
EG:
“You just have to consider how the balance of the car is going to evolve during the race. Basically, what’s the plan going to be in terms of changing the car balance a little bit through the race with the front wing and with all the tools we have in the car.”

Yas Marina is a smooth track and it seems that it takes a while for the track to rubber in. As the grip level increases over the duration of the race weekend, how do you determine where the limit is from Friday to Saturday to Sunday?
EG:
“It’s very simple. You always go to the limit, and then if the limit is on one level, you reach that level. If it goes increasing through the weekend, you adapt to that.”

Do you have any milestones or moments from your junior career that you enjoyed at Abu Dhabi?
EG:
“Abu Dhabi was where I got to test a Formula One car after driving a season in GP2.”

What is your favorite part of the Yas Marina Circuit?
EG:
“Definitely the first part, sector one.”

Describe a lap around the Yas Marina Circuit.
EG:
“Coming down into turn one, 90-degree corner, very nice entry starting the lap. You approach with full speed in turns two, three and four, which is almost flat out. Approaching into turn five, you enter with a lot of speed, going deep into the braking but, at the same time, optimising the line into turn six and preparing everything for the hairpin in turn seven, which is one of the most important exits of all. Coming down into one of the longest straights of the track, down into turn eight, very high braking, it’s important to be very consistent between (turns) eight and nine, keeping a very nice balance. You always try to get the nice traction out of turn nine, which is always quite tricky. Coming down through turn 10 into turn 11 for the chicane, which is quite an interesting corner. You want to get the right apex at turn 11 because it’s important to then follow through (turns) 12 and 13. A very challenging corner is (turn) 14 because you have off-banking, which makes the car slide a bit. It’s quite tricky. You come flat out into turns 15 and 16 and you brake with a lot of lateral braking, which is usually quite important to set the brakes correctly. Turn 17 is a 90-degree corner, and (turns) 18 and 19 are a bit similar to (turn) 14 which is a bit off-banking, so it’s quite challenging to get the right grip. Very high-speed corner into (turn) 20, medium- to high-speed corner, which is important to have a good rhythm. Then you come into (turn) 21 with the tires completely overheated and trying to get the right grip for the exit onto the start-finish line.”

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