FFP sanctions for Inter, Roma

The trio have all agreed to pay fines and limit the number of new players they could register in European competition, UEFA said in a statement following a decision by its financial control watchdog.

Among a variety of measures, Inter agreed to pay a fine of up to 20 million euros (??14.5m), which will come out of their revenues from playing in this season’s Europa League. ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? ??

They will also be allowed only 21 players, instead of 25, in their squad if they qualify for European competition next season and Roma would be allowed 22.??

In addition, Inter agreed “to report a maximum break-even deficit of 30 million euros for the financial year ending in 2016 and no break-even deficit for the financial year ending in 2017.”

Similarly, Roma must pay a fine of up to six million euros and must not report combined losses of more than 30 million euros for this year and next year combined.

“The agreement was necessary due to a historical deviation from UEFA’s break-even requirement stemming from past economic losses and the challenging financial situation of the club before the current ownership’s takeover,” Roma said in a statement.

Monaco, who have gone from the French second division to the Champions League quarter-finals in just two years thanks to the financial backing of their Russian billionaire owner Dimitri Rybolovlev, were also penalised.

The side from the Mediterranean principality must pay a fine of up to 13 million euros, with three million euros to be paid in full and the remainder conditional on their compliance with a raft of measures, including the requirement to reach break-even by 2017.

They will also be limited to a 22-man squad, rather than the usual permitted limit of 25, should they qualify for European competition next season.

Turkish giants Besiktas, Sporting Lisbon and Russian sides FC Krasnodar and Lokomotiv Moscow also reached agreements with UEFA, along with CSKA Sofia, Kardemir Karabukspor of Turkey and FC Rostov of Russia.

UEFA’s FFP rules are aimed at preventing clubs from spending more money than they earn and led to both Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain being heavily penalised last year.

They also pledged to curb transfer spending over two seasons.

Comments